A New Year – A New Editor

The new editor somewhere beautiful in Mexico (and definitely working!)

The new editor somewhere beautiful in Mexico (and definitely working!)

While the new year 2019 promises to be an eventful ride – academically, politically, and socially – it is also the begin of my tenure as the new editor of [Re]collection. I am equally humbled and excited to start working on our great blog and online presence, giving you all the amazing content you are used to from my predecessors. Before I introduce myself further, however, I would like to take this moment to thank Dave Papendorf, Jen Vannette, and Chiara Ziletti for their help and guidance, since their respective tenures as editors have put the bar very high for me. I promise to give my best not to disappoint them.

Before landing this job, I was (and still am) a PhD candidate and teaching assistant in the History Department for the better part of the last four years, culminating in a great last semester (at least for myself, the evaluations aren’t in yet, of course) in which I taught my own course on modern American history. My teaching interests have taken me back and forth between Michigan, Indigenous, and US history, while my research focuses on Global Indigenous and African History – with a special emphasis on the colonial experience. All of these fields have instilled in me a keen interest in the political and social development of America and Africa. I think that future blog entries by yours truly will reflect that emphasis. This semester in particular, I am looking forward to several trips to the colonial and state archives in Germany and Great Britain. Watch this space for updates on how to navigate foreign archives, find material in languages I don’t even speak, and manage to book the cheapest (and worst) hostels in Europe.

The Anna Amalia Library in Weimar - Too pretty to be real (I wish the actual German archives would all look like this one…)

The Anna Amalia Library in Weimar - Too pretty to be real (I wish the actual German archives would all look like this one…)

Beyond the archive and classroom, I am a traditional geek (before it all became chic, I’m afraid), and I might delve into some game-based learning ideas and experiences later in this semester. Especially Reacting to the Past has developed into a staple of teaching in our department, and provides us with a fascinating window into teaching and learning methods, student-led classroom interactions and historical imagination. Besides historical role-playing games I also love movies and TV shows, especially those that have influenced how people think about the world. Who didn’t get their ideas of politics from West Wing and House of Cards, their imagination of the Wild West from John Wayne classics such as The Searchers and Stagecoach, and their perception of the Mafia in America from Goodfellas and The Godfather? Consequently, we will have some experts talk about exactly these influences on popular culture and historical thinking.

Of course, I am more than happy to review and publish any and all relevant contributions by our readers, a.k.a. you! Be it your experiences as students, teachers, parents, or avid consumers of knowledge, don’t hesitate to write a piece and send it to our email address (cmichhistoryblog@gmail.com). Serious pieces on work in the archive, fluff pieces on academic holidays (yes, they do exist!), as well as reflections on your research interests are welcome.

In addition to the blog, I am also excited to bring you all the usual department-related news and updates via some of your favorite social media platforms: Gesichtsbuch (https://www.facebook.com/CmichHistory/) and Zwitscherer (https://twitter.com/cmuhistory)! After all, what is the use of a German editor if he can’t have some fun with ridiculous English company names.

I am looking forward to a surely great semester in the world of academia and university education. Together, I am certain that we will keep this blog amazing!

Introduction 2.0

By Dave Papendorf

Summer is under way, and I hope that you are enjoying nice weather and much-needed time off.  Even though you’re relaxing (hopefully), I will be hard at work as the new editor of the [Re]collection blog for the remainder of 2018.  I am very excited to curate, organize, and present some of the many exciting posts we have ahead this semester.

First, let me introduce myself.  My name is Dave Papendorf, and I will be a fifth-year student in the Transnational and Comparative history PhD program at CMU. I spent this past year teaching and researching for my dissertation.  Before arriving at CMU, I completed my Master of Divinity degree in historical theology at Southern Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky.  Before that, I completed my BA in historical theology at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago.  As a part of CMU’s Joint PhD in history, I also studied for one year studying at Newcastle University in Newcastle, England.  Though I have a background in theology, history has always been of highest interest to me.

My primary area of research is, not surprisingly, the history of Christianity.  Specifically, I study the early stages of the Protestant Reformation in France.  I became intrigued by the topic while studying as an undergraduate student.  Particularly, I realized that none of my assigned textbooks spoke much about the Reformation in France.  When they did, they spoke of the Wars of Religion that began with rising hostility between the Reformed party and a subsection of the Catholic party in France during the 1550s. Simply put, it was extraordinarily unsatisfying to me to find fifty years of religious history (approximately 1500-1550) that seemed to be lost to historians.  This launched my quest to find the answer.

In order to find this answer – or, at least, to get a closer look at the evidence that can lead to an answer – I have studied for nine more academic years, learned to read in two new languages, and read over three-hundred books (I counted!).  And I’m still a long way off!  Though the journey has been difficult, frustrating, utterly fascinating, and time-intensive, I have enjoyed the ride so far.  Most importantly, it has been my curiosity that has kept me going. Ultimately, I think this is what keeps historians going – the insatiable desire to learn new things.  

Some of the most interesting things I have learned along my journey studying history have not been related to history at all; in fact, many of them have a wider application to numerous fields and professions. I hope to gather some of these lessons and share them with you over the next six months as the editor. Thankfully, I have met some great people in my 5 years at CMU.  Many of them will be contributing to the blog soon, so stay tuned for words of wisdom, professional advice, and lots of interesting answers to questions about which we are all curious.  Finally, I want to thank my friend and colleague Chiara Ziletti for her excellent work this past semester as editor of the blog – she has done a tremendous job, and we will surely miss her.

I wish all of you a happy Fourth of July, and I look forward to hearing from some of you.  As always, we encourage and welcome your submissions.

Thank You for the Music

The Little Prince  by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.

The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.

By Chiara Ziletti

In the past six months, my weeks have been rhythmed by the publishing of a blog post here every Tuesday. I still remember how nervous I was when I published my first blog post: “Will people like it? Have I done everything correctly?” As an anxious novice editor, these and many other doubts crossed my mind, but little by little I became more and more self-confident. However, with the beginning of July my appointment as the editor comes to an end. It is time to pass the baton to our new editor, David Papendorf. I am sure he will do great, and I cannot wait to read the new blog posts that he will publish. However, I have to admit that now that the time has come to leave this position I have bittersweet feelings. Indeed, the time I spent being the editor of [Re]collection has meant a lot to me. As the fox says to the Little Prince: “It is the time you spent for your rose that makes your rose so important.” For these six months the blog has been my rose, and I leave this position with the same mixed feelings that a parent would have when seeing off his own grown child. You know your child is going to be fine, but you cannot avoid being nostalgic. Therefore, in this last blog post that I get to publish, I would like to reflect on what being an editor means to me, what I have learned, and express my gratitude for this wonderful opportunity that I had.

As I mentioned, the first times I was publishing a post, I was quite nervous because there is more work behind the scenes than one would expect. Being an editor means that you are the one responsible for the content published on the blog, but this does not mean that you merely have to copy and paste what the authors send you. In my time as the editor of [Re]collection, I had, for example, to keep contact with the authors, think of possible interesting topics for future posts, decide what to publish and when, edit (and rarely write) blog posts, fight with technology (indeed, who does not fight with the computer’s programs, the printer, or else occasionally?), manage the social media accounts, and refresh my knowledge of copyright laws and what fair use is (especially when it comes to images posting). All this requires organizational skills, decision-making, relational skills, a good amount of resourcefulness and initiative, attention to the details, consistency, a more than good command of grammar and style, critical thinking, keeping an eye on current events that might make for a good blog post, and much more. Therefore, I am glad that I had the opportunity of being the editor of [Re]collection because it has allowed me to grow professionally and strengthen my proficiency in all these fields.

However, an editor does not go too far without his authors. Therefore, I want to thank every person who wrote something for the blog, you are what makes this blog alive and so interesting. I loved to meet and work with you, be it in person or just via email. Thank you for cooperating with me, writing your posts, and patiently complying with my suggestions and edits. I enjoyed reading you posts, and I learned something from all of you. Indeed, getting to read from different authors is one of the best things of this job because not only you discover new thigs on several topics that otherwise you might not know or think about, but you give the authors the opportunity to reach out other people with their work.

Lastly, I want to thank the history department for giving me the opportunity to be the editor of [Re]collection. Similarly to the conference (IGHSC) that our PhD students organize, I believe that [Re]collection is a great opportunity that not so many other history departments offers yet. Indeed, organizing conferences and being responsible for a publication are as much part of the academic world as reading, teaching, and writing. Alongside the transnational program, the conference and the blog are what makes our PhD program truly exceptional. Having the opportunity to get out of our bubble by meeting other international students and scholars, becoming good friends, and having the possibility to reach out to the wider public and showing what we do is, indeed, invaluable. I am happy that we get to build bridges and connections.

I hope those who have been reading the blog so far have been enjoying it and finding good content. I, for sure, leave this position with much more than I started with, both professionally and as a person. Even if it is time for me to move on to a new adventure, [Re]collection will always have a special place into my heart. For this reason, I beg your pardon for this final, oversentimental post. I would like to give my final thanks to Jennifer Vannette. Thank you for training me, your suggestions, and support, they meant a lot to me. To Dave, “in bocca al lupo!” And as always, we welcome your submissions. (^_^)

New Year, new editor

Chiara visiting the Yerebatan Sarnıcı in Istanbul. The cistern was built in the 6th century under Justinian I. The cistern was also one of the locations of the 1963 James Bond movie  From Russia with Love.

Chiara visiting the Yerebatan Sarnıcı in Istanbul. The cistern was built in the 6th century under Justinian I. The cistern was also one of the locations of the 1963 James Bond movie From Russia with Love.

By Chiara Ziletti

The holiday break has been great (probably even more than great if – like me – you love having a lot of time to read on the couch), but the new semester is finally here. It is time to roll up the sleeves, put away all the decorations, and get ready for this new adventure.

My name is Chiara Ziletti, and I have the pleasure to be the new editor of [Re]collection. I come from Italy, and I am a third-year student in the Transnational and Comparative History PhD program here at Central Michigan University. Allow me to introduce myself.

Back in school, my relationship with history was one of “love and hate.” Something in it attracted me (for example, I have always loved visiting museums and historical places), but most of the time the amount of dates to be memorized discouraged any deeper approach to it beyond the basic “let’s study to pass the test.” After high-school, I decided to study Italian Literature at University of Pavia (which was founded in 1361, more than 650 years ago!), and it was during those years that I discovered my passion for history. Classes like philology and history of Italian Language had already captivated me. I loved to understand why and how Italian had evolved from Latin, but the real breakthrough was the Early Modern European History class. It was while taking that class that I realized how much I actually enjoyed studying history despite being very bad at remembering dates. This happened because for the first time a professor made me realize that history was more than just sheer memorization. Finally, someone was teaching me about broader historical events and concepts. Thanks to that professor, I became aware – borrowing from Fernand Braudel – of the longer and broader social, economic, and cultural trends and forces beyond the history of events; and I was fascinated. I loved the deeper understanding coming from the combination of these different historical planes; and those aspects of human history capable of transcending time conquered my imagination. After that experience, I began to take more and more classes in history, enabling me to deepen my knowledge and understanding of both the past and our own reality (all this enriched by the development of critical thinking and writing skills).

Following my bachelors, I earned my Masters Degree in European History (again from University of Pavia). During my Masters, I also had the opportunity to do a four months internship in Istanbul with the Erasmus Placement program. Istanbul is a big and chaotic city, but it is also fascinating and full of history. Therefore, even though I was doing my internship at Maltepe University on the Asian side of the city, I had the opportunity to go visiting all the historical sites on the European side over the weekends – what a dream!

After obtaining my Masters, my personal adventure brought me to CMU, where I was admitted in the Transnational and Comparative History PhD program. Here I furthered my training as a historian, and soon I will have to take my Comprehensive examination (for a taste of the fear, imagine Darth Vader approaching on the notes of the Imperial march). In addition to this, I also had the opportunity to work as a Teaching Assistant for the Department of History (an enriching experience), and now I am the new editor of [Re]collection after Jennifer graduated last semester. I want to congratulate her on her success. Furthermore, I want to thank her for her wonderful job here in the past year. If I feel more confident about my future work here, it is thanks to the solid path she traced.

I wish everyone a happy new year and the best for this new semester. As always, we continue to welcome your submissions!


 

Beginnings and Endings

empty office.jpg

By Jennifer Vannette

“In our everyday life we are so busy moving on to the next task or the next interaction with someone that it can feel like we never finish one thing before starting the next. A mindful goodbye allows you to fully absorb your experience so that it can become part of your learning.” -- Gretchen Schmelzer

Graduations mark both beginnings and ends. We are told in numerous speeches that we will go out an make our mark on the world, that we should venture forth with hope and confidence. That's all well and good, but perhaps it's just as important to consider what is ending. Saturday evening marked my last milestone as a grad student at Central Michigan University. I graduated, and I have to say, the view from the front row was rather nice. The view looking back at my time here is bittersweet. I'm ready to move on, and yet saying goodbye is never easy.

I've been in limbo since my dissertation defense -- not quite a grad student anymore but not yet gone. As annoying as that was at times -- what do I call myself anyway? what am I doing besides blogging occasionally? -- it was a nice to have time to transition. I began to detach myself from the program without having to quit cold turkey. But the nature of academia is to say goodbye. I've been thinking about that quite a bit lately. We leave behind schools as we progress, and if we reach the other side and teach, we say goodbye to class after class. We don't often talk about it, and yet to be an academic is to practice saying farewell a lot.

I'm not going to share anything particularly personal or profound in this brief post. I'm just going to offer that in the rush of going from one semester to the next, we might reflect about how to teach something better or what course to take next or where the next research trip will take us, but we can easily avoid being introspective. The transition time between defense and graduation allowed me to think more deeply about who I became in my time at CMU and what parts of that person matter most to me. That has helped sharpen my focus as I plan my next steps in an uncertain job market. Because I've had the limbo time, I've been able to evaluate my experience and consider more deeply how that experience will apply to my life moving forward. And, so, I've come to value this transition time. It sort of seemed like a waste to have so much time between defense and graduation, but now I'm grateful, and I hope others will find value in the limbo-space as well.

So, my time as editor of [Re]collection also draws to a close. I've enjoyed serving you, the readers, and the history department in this capacity this past year. I am honored that I was trusted to shape this early phase of the project, and I trust you all will continue to submit and participate as the years go on. I will be leaving the blog in the more than capable hands of our new editor, Chiara Ziletti.

I've also discovered that there is virtually no way to write a goodbye without it sounding cheesy in the end, and I don't want that. So, even though it's not night, I'll borrow from Edward R. Murrow and say, "Good night and good luck."

In Defense of History: A New Blog Feature

Paul Revere sounding the call. Boston.

Paul Revere sounding the call. Boston.

The blog is changing. Even historians can stride purposefully towards progress!  If you go up to the Newsworthy tab, you will notice a drop down menu with two options: News & Happenings, which has all the announcements you are familiar with finding under Newsworthy, and the new In Defense of History.

In Defense of History is where you will find links to different resources that discuss the importance of studying history and the usefulness of a history degree (or more broadly liberal arts/humanities). The collection of articles features people such as entrepreneur Mark Cuban stating that liberal arts is the future or The Harvard Business Review echoing the sentiment and arguing that innovative thinkers come from the humanities. David Kalt, the founder of Reverb.com penned a piece for the Wall Street Journal saying that he was wrong to believe he need computer science people exclusively to build his business. He wrote, “A well-­rounded liberal arts degree establishes a foundation of critical thinking. Critical thinkers can accomplish anything.”

While we need to apply our critical thinking skills to our own field and question whether or not we are effectively communicating the importance of historical studies to our universities and the broader public, we should also remember that it’s not all doom and gloom. There are many people who understand our abilities and want to have us on their team.

So, when you need a dose of inspiration, an injection of optimism, or resources to boost your argument, you will find a growing archive under In Defense of History. Feel free to pass along suggestions for the page. Send links to cmichhistoryblog@gmail.com

Welcome

Historical studies… a good excuse to travel. St. Andrews, Scotland

Historical studies… a good excuse to travel. St. Andrews, Scotland

Welcome to this new space created by the Department of History at Central Michigan University. Okay, it’s technically a blog but we like the word 'space' because we hope this becomes a participatory community — a place where you can engage and contribute. 

[Re]collection is a completely new project of the history department and it will certainly evolve over time. Why the name [Re]collection? Mostly because Greg secretly abhors the word "blog," so we had to avoid that. But in all seriousness, we selected a name that evokes the many aspects of life as a historian and historical studies in general. Memory and recollection are an intimate part of studying the past, but even more than that the name evokes the act of collecting evidence and information (Re: collection). It is a space where current and former faculty, students, and friends of the department can gather and share the work that is important to us. We hope you will soon find it an indispensable place for department news and connections. 

[Re]collection will feature posts by faculty, grad students, undergrads, and alumni on a variety of topics. We will offer discussions about teaching, get a glimpse at research in progress, get the insider's view on studying abroad, and learn about what in the world people do with their history degrees. Part of what we plan to do is to pull back the curtain, so to speak, and show people what it is like to study, teach, or otherwise engage with our discipline.

To contribute, send a post that is 500-800 words to Jennifer at cmichhistoryblog@gmail.com. You can check out the 'Submissions' tab for more details. No need for a lot of academic jargon. Your post can tell a story, explain a teaching strategy, or seek to foster further discussion about a potential research avenue. Perhaps you want to share about an archival trip or explore public history. Maybe you are knowledgable about digital humanities or the ever-changing job market.  Be creative with your ideas. To build this community we need your contributions. 

Greg Smith, Jon Truitt, and Jennifer Vannette