Andrew Wehrman at the “Spirit of Inquiry in the Age of Jefferson Symposium” and at the “GameChangers Ideas Festival”

Congratulations to Dr. Wehrman, who has been invited to speak at the “Spirit of Inquiry in the Age of Jefferson Symposium” at the American Philosophical Society in June, and to the “GameChangers Ideas Festival” in North Dakota in October. Both these events are open to public and registration is open.

From the American Philosophical Society website: “In commemoration of the 275th anniversary of the American Philosophical Society’s founding in 1743 and the birth of its long-time President, Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826, APS 1780, President 1797-1814), the APS Library, along with the National Constitution Center and the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello, are organizing a daylong symposium that aims to explore the history of science, knowledge production, and learning during the Age of Jefferson (1743-1826).” For the full program of the event, click here.

The “GameChangers Ideas Festival” is organized by Humanities North Dakota, an independent non-profit organization established in 1974. Form the “GameChangers Ideas Festival” website: “Our Founding Fathers believed in the importance and the power of ideas to change people’s lives. Our nation’s history has been a great adventure in ideas. The GameChanger Ideas Festival was created to continue this proud tradition and provide people opportunities to engage with and debate life-changing-ideas, because democracy demands wisdom and vision in its citizens. … We invite people to our stage who challenge the status quo and strive to make changes to critical systems that honor our shared humanity. We believe that civil disagreement and debate are stepping stones for learning. The GameChanger Ideas Festival does not take political stances on issues. Instead we strive to offer a variety of viewpoints from people with both scholarly insight and hands-on knowledge. These aren’t just people with good ideas, but people who have put their ideas to action in the real world.”

BLACKBURN LECTURE: Edward Ayers, "Civil War and Emancipation in the Heart of America"

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Next week! Join us for the George M. Blackburn Endowed Lecture on the Civil War and Reconstruction by Dr. Edward Ayers, who will present "Civil War and Emancipation in the Heart of America" on Friday, April 20 at 7:30 pm in the Park Library Auditorium. Open to all.

Edward Ayers is Tucker-Boatwright Professor of the Humanities at the University of Richmond, where he is President Emeritus. President Barack Obama awarded him the National Humanities Medal in 2013. Ed is serving as president of the Organization of American Historians for the 2017-18 term. Over his decades of work of writing history, experimenting with digital scholarship, collaborating in public history, and teaching and leading in higher education, Ed has tried to find new ways to connect people with the American past.”

Jennifer Vannette in the Washington Post

Congratulations to Jennifer Vannette, whose article "What really drives mass shooters to commit atrocities" has been published in Made by History in the Washington Post.

Jennifer Vannette earned her PhD in U.S. History at Central Michigan University in Fall 2017 with a dissertation titled "Aftermath of Genocide: the World Jewish Congress and The Fight for Human Rights."

 

History Department Students at SRCEE

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Our students will exhibit their research at the 25th Annual Student Research & Creative Endeavors Exhibition tomorrow Wednesday, April 11 from 1:00 pm until 4:00 pm in Finch Field House. The exhibition is open to all. We hope you will join us to discover the latest research and meet our students!

Here is a list of the history department students' exhibits that will be available tomorrow:

  • From Tradition to Modernity: The Transformation of Japanese Martial Arts through the Meiji Restoration (Display #228)
    Primary Author: David Banas Jr.
    Primary Faculty Sponsor: Jennifer Demas
  • Misappropriation of African Culture in the United States: The Banjo (Display #229)
    Primary Author: Ryan Warriner, winner of the 2018 Robert Newby Award for Diversity Efforts (read the blog post he wrote for us on his research here)
    Primary Faculty Sponsor: Lane Demas
  • Turnerism in Michigan - A Study of German Gymnastics and Political Thought (Display #230)
    Primary Author: Felix Zuber
    Primary Faculty Sponsor: Lane Demas
  • Regime Change, Strategic Security, and the Revolution of 1688-90 in Scotland: The Role and Activities of the Scottish Parliament and the Scottish Privy Council, 1689-91 (Display #231)
    Primary Author: Gillian Macdonald
    Primary Faculty Sponsor: Carrie Euler
  • Acontius’ Ideas in Favor of Religious Tolerance: Adiaphora, Fallibilism, and Freedom of Conscience (Display #232)
    Primary Author: Chiara Ziletti
    Primary Faculty Sponsor: Carrie Euler
  • Allied “Luftgangster” and the German Population: The Mistreatment of Downed American Airmen in Germany during World War II (Display #233)
    Primary Author: Kevin Hall
    Primary Faculty Sponsor: Eric Johnson
  • Occultism, Magic, and History. Jesuit Philosophers in the Seventeenth-Century Iberian World (Display #234)
    Primary Author: Carlos Hugo Zayas-Gonzalez
    Primary Faculty Sponsor: Jonathan Truitt

Hugo Zayas' dissertation defense, "Makers of Knowledge: Seventeenth-Century Jesuit Intellectual Culture in the Spanish World"

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Hugo Zayas will be defending his dissertation this Friday, April 13 at 10:00am in the Garden View Room of the Park Library (Room 337). The title of his dissertation is: “Makers of Knowledge: Seventeenth-Century Jesuit Intellectual Culture in the Spanish World.”

2018 IGHSC Conference Program

Only few days until the 2018 International Graduate Historical Studies Conference starts. The latest version of the conference program is now available. We hope you will join us on Friday 6 and Saturday 7 April!

To download the latest pdf version of the conference program click here.

2018 International Graduate Historical Studies Conference; Alan Taylor, "Transforming North America: Empires and Republics in War and Peace, 1800-1850"

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Join us for the 2018 International Graduate Historical Studies Conference "Real and Imagined Borders: People, Place, Time." The conference is hosted by the Department of History and will take place on April 6-7 in the Bovee University Center

Dr. Alan Taylor will give the keynote address "Transforming North America: Empires and Republics in War and Peace, 1800-1850" on Friday, April 6 at 7:30pm in the Park Library Auditorium. A reception will follow the talk.

Dr. Alan Taylor is the Thomas Jefferson Chair in American History at the University of Virginia. He specializes in early United States history, and he is the author of a number of books about the colonial history of the United States, the American Revolution, and the early American Republic. Since 1995, he has won two Pulitzer Prizes and the Bancroft Prize, and was a finalist for the National Book Award for non-fiction.

Hendrik Meijer on Arthur Vandenberg (March 19)

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Hendrik Meijer, co-chairman and CEO of Meijer, Inc. and author of Arthur Vandenberg: The Man in the Middle of the American Century (University of Chicago Press, 2017), will give a talk about the book — on the writing of which which he has also written a post for this blog — on Monday, March 19 at 7pm in the Park Library Auditorium. A reception will follow the talk.

Vandenberg, who represented Michigan in the U. S. Senate from 1928 to 1951, was a prominent isolationist who came to question his position by the end of World War II. “Our oceans,” he declared in a famous speech in January 1945, “have ceased to be moats.” A lifelong Republican, Vandenberg went on to work with two Democratic administrations in the creation of the post-war foreign policy that would come to define “the American century.”

Longtime NPR correspondent Cokie Roberts writes of Meijer’s work, “every member of Congress should read this book.” Join us to discover why. 

This presentation is co-sponsored by the Clarke Historical Library and the Critical Engagements initiative of the College of Humanities and Social and Behavioral Sciences at Central Michigan University.

Dale Hutchinson, "Disease and Demography: Reconstructing Health in Colonial North America"

Dr. Dale Hutchinson, professor of anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will give a talk on "Disease and Demography: Reconstructing Health in Colonial North America" on Thursday, February 22, at 5:00 pm, in Anspach 162. The talk is part of the Critical Engagements initiative at CHSBS (“People On the Move: Borders, Boundaries, and Migration”), and is sponsored by the Departments of History and Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work.

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RESCHEDULED — Edward Ayers, "Civil War and Emancipation in the Heart of America"

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Please note that this lecture has been rescheduled for Friday, April 20.

Join us for the George M. Blackburn Endowed Lecture on the Civil War and Reconstruction by Dr. Edward Ayers who will present "Civil War and Emancipation in the Heart of America" on Friday, February 23 April 20 at 7:30 pm in the Park Library Auditorium. Open to all.

Edward Ayers is Tucker-Boatwright Professor of the Humanities at the University of Richmond, where he is President Emeritus. President Barack Obama awarded him the National Humanities Medal in 2013. Ed is serving as president of the Organization of American Historians for the 2017-18 term. Over his decades of work of writing history, experimenting with digital scholarship, collaborating in public history, and teaching and leading in higher education, Ed has tried to find new ways to connect people with the American past.”

Jay Martin in the International Journal of Maritime History

Congratulations to Jay Martin, whose article “‘Scows, and barges, or other vessels of box model’: Comparative capital investment in the sailing scows of the Great Lakes of North America and in New Zealand” has just been published in the International Journal of Maritime History.

Dr. Michelle Cassidy presented on the involvement of Native Americans from the Odawa and Ojibwa tribes during the U.S. Civil War.

On February 10, during the celebration of the Isabella County 159th Founder's day, CMU History professor Michelle Cassidy gave a presentation on the involvement of Native Americans from the Odawa and Ojibwa tribes during the U.S. Civil War.

From the Morning Sun report:

"Founded in 1863, the Union-aligned Company K had approximately 136 Anishinaabe members, mostly from the Odawa and Ojibwa tribes; a total of approximately 20,000 Native American men fought for the Union and Confederate armies combined. Specifically, about 27 men in Company K came from Isabella County, Cassidy said."

(dis)ABLED BEAUTY: the evolution of beauty, disability, and ability

An invitation from Dr. Brittany Fremion:

I would like to invite you to the exhibit opening of (dis)ABLED BEAUTY: the evolution of beauty, disability, and ability on Thursday, February 8, 2018.  The exhibit is hosted by the Clarke Historical Library and features student and faculty work from the Department of History in the College of Humanities and Social and Behavioral Sciences.  

The exhibit is a celebration of highly designed assistive devices, adaptive devices, and apparel for those living with disabilities. A companion to the exhibition, The (dis)ABLED BEAUTY Oral History Project places the experiences and perceptions of people with disabilities at the center of this exhibition. Dr. Brittany Fremion (History), Dr. Stacey Lim (Audiology), Adam Strom (Due South Productions), and advanced undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in HST 585: Oral History in fall 2017 gathered over 15 hours of interviews, preserved in the research collection of the Museum of Cultural and Natural History at CMU. Portions of individual stories are featured in the exhibition to weave together a narrative that explores the history, perception, and experience of disability. The stories of current and former CMU students, faculty and staff, as well as those from individuals engaged in Disability fashion, activism, and adaptive sports, help to make clear that there is no singular disability or experience.

The evening's festivities will begin with a guest speaker at 7:00 pm in the Park Library Auditorium.  Guest speaker, Heidi McKenize, was in an accident that left her paralyzed from the chest down and subsequently went on to found, Alter Ur Ego, a clothing company for wheelchair users.  

Following the guest speaker, Alexis Jones will be presenting her American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists (AATCC) award winning designs for children with autism. 

In collaboration with the exhibit, Fashion Merchandising and Design students worked on surface designing prosthetic legs (that were graciously donated by Springer Prosthetic & Orthotic Services) and submitted their work to a juried competition sponsored by Threads Fashion show and Michigan State University's department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. The student's designs will be on display at the library for the exhibit.  Awards will be distributed to 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners along with a viewer's choice award following the guest speaker.  

Then, at 8:00 pm, guests are invited to tour the grand opening of the (dis)ABLED BEAUTY exhibit. Hors d'oeuvres and wine will be served.  

I hope that you will be able to attend and celebrate the evening with us.  If you have any questions, please let me know. 

Game of Privilege has received the 2017 Herbert Warren Wind Book Award

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We are proud to announce that CMU history professor Lane Demas's new book Game of Privilege has received the 2017 Herbert Warren Wind Book Award. The United States Golf Association published an interview with Dr. Demas on February 2, 2018. From the USGA website:

Established in 1987, the Herbert Warren Wind Book Award recognizes and honors outstanding contributions to golf literature while seeking to broaden the public’s interest in, and knowledge of, the game of golf. Wind, who died in 2005, was a renowned writer for The New Yorker and Sports Illustrated. He is the only writer to win the Bob Jones Award, the USGA’s highest honor. 

Game of Privilege: An African American History of Golf, authored by this year’s recipient, Dr. Lane Demas, is a groundbreaking exploration of the role of race, class and access to the game of golf. Dr. Demas details the history of black golfers during the age of segregation, the legal battle to integrate public golf courses, and the little-known history of the United Golfers Association, an all-black golf tour that operated from 1925 to 1975.

‘I’m proud of the fact that this book provides a narrative and historical content that’s accessible to everyone, especially the everyday golf fan,’ said Dr. Demas. ‘It’s very humbling to receive this prestigious award and be recognized by a premier organization such as the USGA.’

Game of Privilege was published by the University of Carolina Press in September 2017.

Congratulations to Dr. Demas!

Christia Mercer on Prisons and the History of Philosophy

As part of the Critical Engagements initiative at CHSBS (“People On the Move: Borders, Boundaries, and Migration”), the Department of Philosophy and Religion is hosting two talks by Christia Mercer, Gustave M. Berne Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University, on February 1 and 2. Dr. Mercer’s scholarly work has focused on understanding the role of women in the history of philosophy, including a forthcoming book on the philosophy of the seventeenth-century English philosopher, Anne Conway. She was the first professor to teach in Columbia University’s Justice-in-Education Initiative, which offers courses to incarcerated and formerly incarcerated people. 

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Spring 2018 History Department On-Campus Events

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Mark your calendars! Here are all the History Department On-Campus Events for the Spring 2018 semester.

Please note that date for the George M. Blackburn Lecture Series on American Civil War and Reconstruction History has changed. Dr. Edward Ayers' lecture "Civil War and Emancipation in the Heart of America" has been rescheduled for Friday, April 20 at 7:30 pm in the Park Library auditorium. 

Please note that John Mraz's lecture "Doing History with Modern Media" has been cancelled.

All lectures are open to the public!